Author Topic: Cubie DIN Rail Mount  (Read 5318 times)

boris_G

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Cubie DIN Rail Mount
« on: February 20, 2013, 03:03:30 am »
Hello all,

Inspired by the Simple Case included with the Rich Pack I got just before Christmas, and also the Rugged Circuits DIN Rail Mount (http://ruggedcircuits.com/html/din_rail_mount.html) I have made a Cubie DIN Rail Mount.

Construction was extremely simple, the implementation of not cracking the 2mm plastic was my biggest worry. My friend Dave cut and drilled the plastic to suit. We used dimensions of 102mm x 62mm.

The end result:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32062936@N07/8491830852/in/photostream
http://www.flickr.com/photos/32062936@N07/8491830840/in/photostream

The grey plastic clip on the rear of the white plastic plate simply clips onto the top of the DIN rail, then is pushed down in an arc till it clicks in place.

Here it is in its new natural habitat, mounted to the DIN rail in the bottom of my rack, above my 48VDC rectifier, and in front of my HP T5630w thin client:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/32062936@N07/8490739021/in/photostream

The project, a twenty minute build, went well, and the end result does what I want it to. The ports are easily accessible (probably would be better if it were on a real DIN rail, not in a rack) but potentially with a metal case, one could use this in industrial automation quite easily. Indeed, with a metal case, you could mount a 1.8 inch SSD inside that case, and connect via SATA, which is connected in my end result photo.

With the large number of I/O, and the ability to run a Real Time Kernel, one could then use something like this in order to make a small automation controller with integrated display, ethernet, and USB. Of course, I wouldn't be using USB in a high electrical noise environment, and yes, I'd encase the SATA drive inside a potential metal case.

But in the meantime, tell me what you think - this was inspired, in part, from the Arduino DIN Rail Mount, and I have a Freetronics EtherTen hooked up with a power metering shield next to it on the rail. Eventually, the two will swap information via ethernet, and combined with Insteon home automation control, this could be a powerful system, that can live nicely in a structured cabling environment, as I suspect I will find in many new houses when I gain my FTTP Installers accreditation, later this year.

Of course, the possibilities are totally endless... and I hope this easy project has inspired you!

Boris.